Running Head EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND CARE

Running Head EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND CARE

Running Head: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND CARE













Early Childhood Education and Care

Name of the Student

Name of the University

Author Note



Table of Contents





Introduction

Children in early childhood require plenty of love, care and attention to feel secure and happy. In this essay I discuss the theories that I find most useful when dealing with babies and those that I would actually apply when entrusted with their care.

  1. Theoretical Reflection

    1. Theories that are most useful for Understanding Child Development

The theories that I believe would be most useful in my understanding of child development are those put forward by Penelope Leach (2013), that is, that babies don’t judge the way adults do, that there are indeed certain babies who don’t like being held and that there are babies who can never find a reason to be happy. This is because not all babies are the same and some have their unique personality traits which need to be understood before getting stressed when handling them.

    1. The Child Development Theory that I Agree with the Most

I personally agree the most with the theory of Penelope Leach (2013), that children are non-judgmental and that parents should stop worrying when their kids start crying.

    1. A New Child Development Theory that I Can Apply when Working with Children

An effective and new child development theory that I can apply when working with children, is that put forward by Britto et al. (2017), that is, that not all babies like being held or cuddled.

    1. My Own Theory of Child Development – Giving Children Space

Babies need to be given their own space to grow and get independent. I don’t believe that I can do a lot of good for babies by mollycoddling them and giving them whatever they want, including my attention, at all times.

2. Application of Childcare Strategy in my Own Life

When handling very young children or babies, I will follow a strategy that aims at getting children to put in effort and be persistent. If an infant is unable to reach his toy, I will allow him to try his best to reach it by making the effort to crawl over to it and be persistent enough to get it.







References

Britto, P. R., Lye, S. J., Proulx, K., Yousafzai, A. K., Matthews, S. G., Vaivada, T., ... & MacMillan, H. (2017). Nurturing care: promoting early childhood development. The Lancet389(10064), 91-102.

Leach, P. (2013). Your baby and child. Knopf.