MGB340 International Business in Asia Pacific

MGB340 International Business in Asia Pacific

MGB340 International Business in Asia Pacific

Mitsubishi Corporation in Japan

Strategy

Mitsubishi Corporation is Japan largest trading company, the corporation was founded in 1950 with its headquarters based in Chiyoda, Tokyo (Buckley & Ghauri, 2018 p.569). The corporation law develops and operates businesses across virtually every industry such as machinery, energy, and industrial finance. Mitsubishi corporation strategy is based on the sound foundation to its management and sustainable growth, the corporation has adhered to the management initiatives based on their perspectives including growth, profitability, and efficiency (Buckley & Ghauri, 2011 p. 262). The group through its diverse strategies has taken the challenge of resolving environmental issues, resources, and energy issues.

Corporate organization

Mitsubishi Corporation is based on three corporate principles, the spirit and values have been in place since 1934. The first principle is Corporate Social Responsibility that entails their consistent efforts to resolve to contribute to society and strive to enrich the society both materially and spiritually while contributing towards the preservation of the global environment (Burke, 2014 p. 467). The second principle is integrity and fairness where the group emphasizes maintaining the principles of transparency and openness conducting businesses with integrity and fairness. The third principle comprises of international understanding through trade, where the company is globally minded with an aim to expand business on an all-encompassing global perspective.

Core capabilities

Mitsubishi Corporation core competencies can be divided into three categories, first information; this competency entails the incorporation of global partnerships, and by so doing the corporation’s ability to implement multiple businesses by joining efforts with other organizations to form beneficial business relationships locally and internationally (Luo, 2011 p.56). The second competency is technology where the corporation has ventured into various technological advancements in order to increase efficiency, owing to the fact that Mitsubishi is a motor company production processes will require technological intervention.

The role of government

Host governments of Mitsubishi Corporation have intervened more and more in the affairs of the corporations. With the implementation of conditions that the corporations will operate under the government policies, the government sets legal objectives to the corporation to pay taxes, for the corporation it enhances trade between the host country and the home country (Rugman, 2015 P.678). The next role of government includes the ability to control market access and offer a variety of inducements to encourage market participation, by so doing the corporation is able to trade freely in addition host governments are provided with the wherewithal to require multinationals to enter into joint venture arrangements, therefore, placing host government representatives on their boards (Cho & Uchikawa, 2017 P. 553).

Toyota in Japan

Strategy

Toyota uses a generic strategy that enables it has a competitive advantage in the global market. On the other hand, the intensive growth strategies define the types of actions that Toyota uses to ensure continued growth. Over the decades the company has portrayed continued success from its innovation, this is evidence that the company has fulfilled these strategies (Lusk, 2014 p.156). Toyota is therefore effective in the consistency and implementation of its strategy which results in intensive growth strategies. Toyota Motor Corporation is a Japanese multinational automotive manufacturer; its headquarters is based in Toyota Aichi Japan (Mottage, 2017 p.16). The corporation strategy emphasizes environmental sustainability aligning accordingly with the Toyotas global vision of respect for the planet. The corporation recently implemented the Toyota environmental challenge 2050 which consists of six goals that seek to go beyond zero environmental impact, therefore, creating a positive impact on the society as well as the planet (Yang & Xu, 2009 p.25). The corporation is in addition focused on other environmental issues including air quality and green building and establishes a commitment to compliance with all applicable environmental laws and regulations.

Corporate Organization

Toyota corporate organization assumes an organizational structure that supports business goals and strategic direction, Toyota a divisional organization structure which however underwent significant changes in 2013, after the changes the organizational structure is now comprised of global hierarchy, geographic division, and product-based divisions. The structure was established with an aim to enhance flexibility, this is because the corporation has established branches in various regions, the new structure enables it to respond to regional market conditions, by so doing the corporation is able to respond to issues and provide higher quality products to its customers all over the world.

Core capabilities

Toyota core competency is its ability to produce automobiles of great quality at best prices, thusly providing a value of money to the customers. Its innovative operations in terms of automobiles production the company is able to contribute immensely to its core competence. Toyota is popularly known with quality aspect of its products which have revolutionized the automobiles industry hence the company pursues a pillar of cost leadership strategy.

Role of Government

State influences in the home country of Toyota, as well as the host country, has been beneficial for the growth of the corporation. Trade protection is one of the major government roles especially in host countries, However, Toyota has engaged in free trade agreements that focus on eliminating tariffs and quotas. Additionally the government in Japan intervened with a demand that the corporation should ensure that the cars manufactured will not have software issues or malfunctions, so doing the government is aiming to enhance quality products as far as technological advancement in manufacturing the cars is concerned, in this way the government will ensure there is no consumer exploitation. Samsung established a position in white goods by the start of the 1980s, nonetheless, the corporation went ahead to investigate further growth opportunities (Thompson, Strickland & Gamble, 2008 p.116).

Samsung Electronics in Korea

Strategy

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. is based in South Korean; the corporation was founded as a electronics company with its headquarters in Suwon. With their core vision which entails the commitment to create a better world full of richer digital experiences, the company is renowned to be one of the largest multinational in Japan. Their strategies have therefore been achieved through innovative technology and products.

Samsung dedicates its efforts to aspects of creativity and innovation with a shared value between the stakeholders and the society, by so doing the company is able to achieve the goal of becoming a beloved brand. The Vision 2020 is at the core of our commitment to creating a better world full of richer digital experiences, through innovative technology and products. The goal of the vision is to become a beloved brand, an innovative company, and an admired company. For this, we dedicate our efforts to creativity and innovation, shared value with our partners, and our great people.

Corporate Organization

Samsung organizational structure is divisional and the company is divided into three key divisions: IT & Mobile Communications (IM), Consumer Electronics (CE), and Device Solutions (DS). Samsung’s large product portfolio aligns with the rationale behind the choice of divisional organizational structure, this is due to the variations of products and services that Samsung offers and their diversified markets. Fundamentally, Samsung’s every division is managed separately taking into account the characteristics of their products that have implications for new product development, marketing, selling and other aspects of the business. Further, Samsung Electronics has established more than 200 subsidiaries around the world (Nottage, 2009 p.76).

Core Capabilities

Competence in the creation of speed: This comes from ambitious goal setting, creating a sense of urgency, a delegation of authority, use of common language and systems, employee work ethics and sense of sacrifice, the company, in addition, makes large preemptive investments to seize every opportunity. For its digital business, the company formed principles of foresight, moving fast, preemption, and seizing opportunities first (Law & Chan, 2017 p.475). Evolutionary innovation is Samsung’s second competency; the corporation has thereby excelled in significantly improving on existing technologies, while not so much in creating a new generation of technologies. The major aspects of the firm’s success is the consistent support of systematic and long-term knowledge creation by setting extended achievements that can only be attained through innovation and creativity, by so doing the firm has heavily invested in the active pursuit of external knowledge, through technology licensing, reverse engineering, strategic partnership, and hiring foreign educated, experienced engineers.

Role of government

The inherent complexity of adding new government services increases the difficulty of operating individual departments and governments as a whole. Increasingly, governments are striving to solve these difficulties by consolidating administrative services and reduce their operating costs as well as significantly reduce duplication of training and staffing needs. Governments are also seeking to rapidly expand online services. To respond to citizen demands for faster, more responsive service, traditional paper-based services are migrated to online platforms. This enables them to provide, despite financial and staffing constraints, more accessible, convenient and cost-effective services with a single point of access. As e-government expands to enable access to confidential information, however, adequate mechanisms for identification, fraud prevention, and information security will become key issues.

Huawei Technologies in China

Strategy

At Huawei, innovation focuses on customer needs. We invest heavily in basic research, concentrating on technological breakthroughs that drive the world forward. We have more than 180,000 employees, and we operate in more than 170 countries and regions. Founded in 1987, Huawei is a private company fully owned by its employees. Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. is a Chinese multinational networking, telecommunications equipment, and Services Company headquartered in Shenzhen, Guangdong. Huawei strategy assumes a straightforward approach by continuously focusing on four sustainability and related strategic initiatives, by so doing the corporation is promoting the harmonious development of the economy, society and the environment, in addition, the corporation as part of their strategy emphasizes on bridging the digital divide by providing people across all geographic areas with ease of access to voice communication services. Further, supporting network stability and security, especially at critical times, for instance, earthquakes, tsunamis, and other natural disasters and emergencies is our highest priority and comes ahead of our own commercial interests. Huawei methodology accept a clear methodology by ceaselessly concentrating on four supportability and related vital activities, by so doing the organization is advancing the amicable advancement of the economy, society, and nature, also, the partnership as a component of their technique underscores on crossing over the computerized partition by furnishing individuals over every single geographic territory easily of access to voice correspondence administrations. Further, supporting system dependability and security, particularly at basic occasions, for example, tremors, tidal waves, and other cataclysmic events and crises is our most astounding need and comes in front of our own business advantages

Corporate Organization

It involves shareholders' Meeting, Independent Auditor, and Supervisory Board. In addition, Human Resources Committee, Audit Committee, Finance Committee Strategy & Development Committee are as well involved in corporate organization. CEO/Rotating CEOs includes Group Functions a) Carrier BG b) Enterprise BG c) Consumer BG. Service BG (SBG) and lastly Financial Investment Management Platform. Bridging this so-called digital divide is vital to a host of development goals, from full access to education and health services through to achieving livable cities and delivering economic opportunity for all. Bridging this so-called digital divide is vital to a host of development goals, from full access to education and health services through to achieving livable cities and delivering economic opportunity for all (Van Tulder, Verbeke, & Voinea, 2012 P. 90).

Role of government

Since the mid-1970s, host governments have interceded increasingly in the undertakings of multinational partnerships. Today they routinely build up rather requesting conditions for MNCs needing to work together in their nations (Lamont, 2008 p.46). What sorts of conditions are these? What sort of danger, assuming any, do they posture to the ordinary activity of corporate basic leadership or to the key independence of corporate directors? Most vital, by what means should the chiefs of multinationals react to them. What's more, as per what criteria should they ascertain their reactions. In this article, the writers - themselves occupied with a long research venture on MNCs - try to give answers to these inquiries. To begin with, they demonstrate that both host-government limitations and MNC reactions can be promptly grouped. Next, they give direction to the fundamental however troublesome demonstration of coordinating those chiefs must endeavor between different classes of government request and corporate response. At last, they propose a portion of the ramifications of accomplishing an appropriate parity for the hierarchical structures of multinationals.

The federal government’s concern was not about the technical capabilities of the Huawei equipment, but rather about the security risks associated with having such equipment in American telecommunications infrastructure. Huawei has been expanding and is the clear leader in 5G R&D. Most imperative, by what means should the head of multinationals respond to them. In this article, the authors - themselves possessed with a long research adventure on MNCs - attempt to offer responses to these requests. In the first place, they show that both host-government constraints and MNC responses can be expeditiously assembled (Jaccard, 2013 p. 475). Next, they provide guidance to the central anyway troublesome exhibition of organizing that boss must undertaking between various classes of government ask for and corporate reaction. Finally, they propose a bit of the implication of achieving a proper equality for the various leveled structures of multinationals.

TECO – Taiwan

Strategy

Teco has globally 30 subsidiaries and affiliates gained who gained a turnover of 1Billion EURO achieved with about 10.000 Employees worldwide. More than 50% of the turnover was generated from Electric Motor business (Nelson, 2008 p.6). It is listed as reference value on the stock exchange in Taipei, Taiwan. Is mainly focused on Sustainable development with new competitive advantages enhancing of service quality developing and education of top-experienced employees Creating outstanding products has Significant Experience in the Motor Industry. State of the art factories in the most important manufacturing markets State of the Art Testing Facilities for the full power and voltage range of its motors

Corporate governance

According to the company's charter, the board of directors has 15 seats (including three for independent directors), for a three-year term. According to article 192-1 of the "Company Act," candidates for the board of directors are nominated and the acceptance of nomination and publication is carried out, in accordance with the regulations of the "Company Act," the "Securities and Exchange Act," and other related laws/regulations (Hitt, Ireland, & Hoskisson, 2017 p. 56). The members of the board of directors are all outstanding figures in industry and academia, boasting abundant corporate-governance experience and industrial technological skills, as well as expertise in banking, finance, accounting, and law (Mu?ller, 2011 p.96).

Role of government

Home governments and host governments of TECO regulates retakes and the generating capacity plans of investor-owned utilities. For instance, the Florida State Public Service Commission has adopted tough rules to reduce the growth rates in electric consumption and the dependence on oil as a generating furl. The state public utility, therefore, sets limits on demand growth for each utility, the TECO Corporation, for instance, was allowed to grow at 85% of TECOs customers’ economic growth rate and demand of 85% on the same (Elger & Smith, 2015 p. 61). The government, therefore, allowed TECO to offer PCS audits.

References

1. Buckley, P., & Ghauri, P. (2011). The global challenge for multinational enterprises. Global challenges Studies I5(7), 262-689.
2. Buckley, P., & Ghauri, P. (2018). The global challenge for multinational enterprises. Global challenges Studies II4(6), 569-575.
3. Burke, P. (2014). Green Pricing in the Asia Pacific: An Idea Who’s Time Has Come. Asia & the Pacific Policy Studies1(3), 467-575.
4. Cho, F., & Uchikawa, S. (2017). Toyota production system and kanban system materialization of just-in-time and respect-for-human system. The International Journal of Production Research15(6), 553-564.
5. Elger, T., & Smith, C. (2015). Assembling work. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Journal of Assemblying work,121(9), 61-75
6. Hitt, M., Ireland, R., & Hoskisson, R. (2017). Strategic management. Boston, MA, USA: Cengage Learning. Journal of Strategic management1(3), 56-57.
7. Jaccard, M. (2013). The objective is quality. Boca Raton, Fla.: London. Journal of quality objectives 23(4), 475-492
8. Lamont, D. (2008). Global Strategy. Chichester: Capstone Pub. Journal of Global Strategy6 (4), p.46-85.
9. Law, K., & Chan, A. (2017). Managing knowledge work in Asia Pacific contexts: case studies of Hong Kong SMEs. Asia Pacific Business Review23(4), 475-492.
10. Luo, Y. (2011). Strategy, structure, and performance of MNCs in China. Westport, Conn.: Quorum Books. Journal of Structure management3 (13), p.56-87.
11. Lusk, S. (2014). Rethinking Public Strategy. Strategic management. Boston, MA, USA: Cengage Learning. Journal of Strategic management, p.156-277
12. 
Mottage, M. (2017). Business Systems and Organizational Capabilities, Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin 6(11), p.16-37
13. Mu?ller, C. (2011). Case study and comparative strategic analysis of Toyota and Ryanair. Mu?nchen: GRIN Verlag GmbH. 6 (12), p.96-107
14. Nelson, S. (2008). Strategic planning for results. Chicago: American Library Association. Journal of Strategic management6 (9), p.6-7
15. Nottage, L. (2009). Corporate Governance in the 21st Century. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub. Journal of governance1 (2), 76-97
16. Rugman, A. (2015). The Regional Multinationals. Journal of Strategic management, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, P.678-987.
17. Thompson, A., Strickland, A., & Gamble, J. (2008). Crafting and executing strategy. Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin. Journal of crafting management, p.116-170
18. Van Tulder, R., Verbeke, A., & Voinea, L. (2012). New Policy Challenges for Global MNEs. Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited. P. 90-134.
19. Yang, T.S. and Xu, J., 2009. Efficacy and safety of sorafenib in patients in the Asia-Pacific region with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: a phase III randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The lancet oncology10(1), pp.25-34.