CHC50113 Diploma of Early Childhood Education and Care

CHC50113 Diploma of Early Childhood Education and Care

CHC50113 Diploma of Early Childhood Education and Care

Assessment task 1

Q 1

Principles of the EYLF

  1. To secure respectful and reciprocal relationships

Educators must attune to children’s feelings and thoughts to ensure their sense of wellbeing and must positively interact with the young child in their learning.

  1. Partnership

Educators work in partnership with children’s families where they trust each other, freely communicate and share their perspective about each child and also to have shared decision making

  1. Respect for diversity

Early childhood educators respect the diversities of children and families to foster their learning motivation and to reinforce their sense of being competent learners.

Q2

  • Standard 5.1 respectful and equitable relationship are developed and maintained with each child
  • Element5.1.1 warm and responsive interactions with each child and building trusting relationships
  • Element 5.1.2  Every child is able to engage with educators in meaningful, open interactions that support the acquisition of skills for life and learning.

Standard 5.2

Each child is supported to build and maintain sensitive and responsive relationships with other children and adults.

Element 5.2.1

Each child is supported to work with, learn from and help others through collaborative learning opportunities.

Element 5.2.2

Each child is supported to manage their own behaviour, respond appropriately to the behaviour of others and communicate effectively to resolve conflicts.

Q3

  • In the organization, the programs are developed in accordance with the Australian Early years Learning Framework.
  • To support inclusion and participation of every child and his family in the leaning centres and valuing and respecting each one of them irrespective of their cultural diversities.
  • Intentional teaching is the teaching approach in which educators make thoughtful, informed and deliberate actions and decisions.

    For intentional teaching:
  • Modeling and demonstrating may be used
  • Using Open questioning
  • Children must have access to materials  and explore puzzling questions
  • Adults collaborate with children to solve problems
  • Adults contribute knowledge from their own experience to enrich, challenge and extend children’s learning.

Q5.

In order to encourage children to participate in learning experiences

  • Age specific developmental characteristics can be identified and accordingly programs may be designed
  • By providing vibrant and flexible learning environmnet
  • an approach of learning through play can be adopted
  • also by identifying each child’s individual abilities
  • by selecting appropriate experience and processed to engage children
  • Children’s efforts can be supported through motivation. They must be motivated with positive experiences where their efforts must be praised. Further, their efforts must  be recognized well to keep them self motivated and educators should support the overall learning and motivation process.
  • A children’s right to participate may be respected by letting him choose his own learning and activities. It is important to give children right to choose their own level of participation within the learning business environment since each child has unique abilities, skills and learning styles. Their choice must be acknowledged and affirmed as That’s fine, Mayom. You can just watch if you want to. It’s interesting, isn’t it?

Q6

  1. Children are distributed with pre made response cards or chalkboards and questions are asked. All children are then asked to select a response from the cards or to write answers on their chalk boards. In this way, all children are engaged and involved.
  2. Rubber stamps containing pictures and letters are used. Children find it fun to learn through these stamps and it does not even require fine motor skills.

Q7.

  1. Children’s observations are recorded to have evidence of what children know, can do and understand.  It helps in understanding child’s skills, abilities and interests. Further, this helps in gathering and analyzing information required to develop partnerships with children, their families and other professionals.
  2. It is essential to document and record only what is being seen and heard and by focusing on facts. The observer need to be judgmental and objective and must not allow his own views, values, background influences or feelings while recording the observation.
  3. Example 1: observing, assessing and keeping a record is an integral part of the early childcare centre that allows the organization to reflect on planned curriculum and children’s interests, track their progress and enables the organization to judge their effectiveness over time.
  4. Example 2: all staff are responsible for observing all children and passing observations only to their Key person. The gained information must not be revealed to unauthorized people and should be kept private and confidential.
  5. Example 3: Key persons ensure their key children have observations across all curriculum areas and enter them into each child’s Learning journey.
  6. A code of ethics is basically a document outlining the mission, values and principles of the organization and linking them with standards of professional conduct. The staff and managers may refer this document while making decisions at the work.
  • act in the best interests of all children
  • create and maintain safe, healthy, inclusive environments that support children’s agency and enhance their learning
  • provide a meaningful curriculum to enrich children’s learning, balancing child and educator initiated experiences
  • respect families’ right to privacy and maintain confidentiality
  • Ÿmodel quality practice and provide constructive feedback and assessment for students as aspiring professionals
  • mentor new graduates by supporting their induction into the profession Ÿ
  • advocate for my profession and the provision of quality education and care.

 Q8.
Every child is assessed in early childcare setting to understand his skills, interests, abilities and to understand what he can do. The main purpose of assessment is to plan the curriculum, to describe his abilities and skills, inform parents about his learning and for a child to achieve a goal. However, the information gained during assessment of a child is not to be revealed to everyone and must be protected from unauthorized access. It has to be kept private and confidential to protect the privacy rights of children and families. Further, the observation and assessment need to be informed where families are aware that their children are being assessed.

Benefits of assessment

  1. Assessment helps in indicating each child’s individual skill and capability. Educators collect the evidence of child’s learning and development and analyze it to develop a program addressing the learning needs of the child.
  2. As assessment assists in developing customized program for every child, the child feels more inclusive and valued. He is engaged better and thus, effectively learns and develops.
  3. Assessment as learning can even help children to understand self efficacy as their learning is visible to themselves. Children identify their own ability to take actions that helps them in achieving their goals and therefore, can see progress resulting from their learning efforts.
  4. Summative assessment is the process of summing up of what a child has learned by reviewing documentation gathered over time from various sources. This summative assessment bring together information about what the child knows, understands and can do with reference to EYLF learning outcomes.
  5. The information gained in assessments can be accessed by family of the child, Management, Administration staff and relevant educators caring for the child.

Q9

Strategy 1: collaborative conversations

Educators may engage in collaborative conversations with families to get an insight about child’s interest, values and beliefs. This understanding can assist in planning experiences that expand children’s thinking and interest.

Strategy 2: collaborative documentation

By documenting the observations of children’s activities and sharing it with families, educators can make effective plans for children’s current and future learning

Strategy 3: by encouraging families to contribute to children’s documentation

Q10.

  1. Curriculum can be evaluated through
  • observations and assessments of children’s learning
  • critically reflecting on how curriculum can be improved by analyzing what worked and what didn’t
  • evaluating to what extent were children and families involved in curriculum development
  • referring EYLF to reflect the actions and curriculum
  • by seeking input from children’s families regarding their learning
  1.  To gather feedback from families and children, they must be well involved and educators must work in partnership with them. Educators may
  • become familiar with culturally competent evaluation;
  • be aware of issues relating to consent, privacy and confidentiality when collecting data from children;
  • become familiar with techniques for collecting data from children; and
  • involve children and parents in the evaluation process

Q11.
a) Families can be provided with welcoming environment by

  • by sending a welcome greeting
  • inviting them to beginning school meeting
  • Establishing  positive communication with all families, and give some information about educators
  • Letting them know about organization’s policy and teaching practices

Send home ‘good news’ messages about all students’ behavior and progress. Call parents to tell them something positive their child has done. By sending formal weekly classroom newsletter

b) Parents can be encouraged to share their knowledge by inviting them to be guest in the classroom as a story reader or to help children with an art project or as a song teacher. Further, special events may be organized like informal breakfasts or picnics where parents may be encouraged to share their values, cultural knowledge and skills

c)

  • by organizing regular formal meetings with parents
  • by making regular calls to parents to tell them about child’s activities
  • by sending a weekly newsletter at home informing parents about classroom activities and upcoming events
  • ensuring newsletters are translated in case parents don’t speak English
  • by arranging informal meetings and events

Q12

Several theories have been suggested to explain childhood development and one of the well known theory is Piaget’s cognitive development theory. The theory suggests that As kids interact with the world around them, they continually add new knowledge, build upon existing knowledge, and adapt previously held ideas to accommodate new information and children move through four different stages of mental Organisation Development namely sensorimotor, preoperational, concrete operational and formal operational stage. Piaget has had a great impact on the way childcare practitioners view a child’s learning and the way they are taught, particularly in pre-school and nurseries.

This theory has been applied in the services and a comfortable and safe environment is being provided to them that allows them to explore and interact. Planned free play sessions encourages this exploration and allows them to re-enact and practice real life situations

Q13

It is ensured by the services that the parents of child affected b y any incident is informed as soon as practically possible for them and must not delay it by more than 24 hours. The parents must be given detailed information regarding the incident like how much the child is affected, what actions have been taken along with how he is doing now. Further, the whole incident must be recorded in the services in accordance with the regulations.

Q14

By building a sense of welcome and respect while communicating with families and let them know that the childcare centre is keen to what they want for their child. By keeping a clear and effective communication with children’s families where a mutual trust is build and each other’s values, perspectives and views are valued. By observing every child in the centre, recording his activities and keeping a record of his growth and development.

Assessment task 2

Project 1

it is the service’s policy to regularly keep on evaluating and assessing curriculum and learning programs designed for children where it must be seen whether these are in accordance with each child’s individual learning needs or not. The curriculum must be in accordance with each child’s learning abilities and skills and must ensure that all children reach their full potential in the services.

The policies are written clearly using simple words and in an unambiguous manner to avoid any confusion.
The policies are accessible to staff as they are being placed on the notice board of staff room and also available at the website of the services. It is also filed in a policy manual which is located in the service’s foyer. The policies are designed in accordance with EYLF framework Belonging, Being and becoming document.
The policies are regularly revised to be updated. By comparing the curriculum with the recommended practices and principles. The children are observed and assessed and their leanings are compared with that of recommended learning principles. By encouraging educators to think what they are offering to children and why children are observed, assessed and evaluated to see whether the current curriculum is being able to address their individual  learning needs or not.

Assessment process include both formative and summative assessments as children are formally assessed for their learning and experiences that involves jottings, photos and notes while for the summative assessment involves reviewing the documentation gathered over a time from a range of sources. It is summing up of what the child learned over a time period. Assessment ensures use of NQF for early childhood education and Care. 

The policies and procedures support inclusive practices as every child is equally treated and cared for regardless of his cultural and economic background. Further, policies are available in various languages along with English Gathered information is only shared with families and Key persons and sharing it with any unauthorized people is being avoided.

Observation table

L.O./ Goal

Description/Objective

 

Learning Outcome 1: Identity

Children develop knowledgeable and confident self-identities

Observation: Marry was dancing when the music started with all her friends and even when everyone was hesitating to do so she kept on moving her feet on the music

 

Learning Outcome 2:Connection & contribution

Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation

Educator: analysis and reflections

It was seen that she mixes and get involved with others and feels very happy when she dances and listen to the music beats. She is always seen smiling and happy while dancing.

Learning Outcome 3: Wellbeing

Children become strong in their social and emotional well being

 

Learning Outcome 4: Confidence, involved learners

Children develop a range of skills and processes such as problem solving, enquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, researching and investigating

Follow up: She is generally doing well and the following sessions just require her to mix up with people easily even to those who she has met the first time so that her fear to crowd is somehow reduced.

Learning Outcome 5: Communication

Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional support for child’s learning and development: The child needs emotional support, he needs a counsellor and psychotherapist so that the child can improve his behaviour. He also needs to spent time with his step father.

Outcomes of the program: The outcome of the program will be very fruitful as the parents are very supportive and supportive measure will definitely improve the child’s behaviour and reduce his aggression.

Observation table

L.O./ Goal

Description/Objective

 

Learning Outcome 1: Identity

Children develop knowledgeable and confident self-identities

Observation: Maria and Mary sat together and she copied the sketch made on a postcard and humming tunes while drawing and Mary watched her while copying the postcard.

Learning Outcome 2:Connection & contribution

Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation

Educator: analysis and reflections It can be seen that Maria is very content and happy in sketching and painting something in her free time and she also loves to sing. It reduces her fear of being alone or isolated.

Learning Outcome 3: Wellbeing

Children become strong in their social and emotional well being

 

Learning Outcome 4: Confidence, involved learners

Children develop a range of skills and processes such as problem solving, enquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, researching and investigating

Follow up: as a child to a single parent she needs to be very self dependent and also have a habit of staying alone, so the follow-ups would require more of activities which will help gaining her self-confidence.

Learning Outcome 5: Communication

Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others

 

L.O./ Goal

Description/Objective

 

Learning Outcome 1: Identity

Children develop knowledgeable and confident self-identities

Observation: It was seen that Peter did not enjoy involving in activities with other children but when her mother appears and encourages him, he starts playing badminton with the other children. He starts getting angry at time during the play but her mother asks him to stay calm.

Learning Outcome 2:Connection & contribution

Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation

Educator: analysis and reflections

It is seen that Peter is aggressive at times but when his mother is around he gets calm and composed and also gets involve with others easily in her presence.

Learning Outcome 3: Wellbeing

Children become strong in their social and emotional well being

Information business

Learning Outcome 4: Confidence, involved learners

Children develop a range of skills and processes such as problem solving, enquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, researching and investigating

Follow up: He needs more of activities which takes out anger from him and so that he does his school work and activities comfortably and with interest without losing his temper.

Learning Outcome 5: Communication

Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others

 

Additional support for child’s learning and development: The child needs emotional support, he needs a counsellor and psychotherapist so that the child can improve his behaviour. He also needs to spent time with his step father.

Outcomes of the program: The outcome of the program will be very fruitful as the parents are very supportive and supportive measure will definitely improve the child’s behaviour and reduce his aggression.

Step 3 

  1. The learning environment and materials would be evaluated against children’s need and a checklist, according to which the materials and environment may be rated. For instance, the checklist would have points like is the material and environment are appropriate to the needs of the cultural groups or delivery sector; content is balanced and accurate; material allows task based learning, etc.
  2. The learning environment was modified following the evaluation phase. The areas on which the environment received a low rating was being altered. For instance, images of diverse family styles were being placed in the services and more of open and free space was created for children to play.
  3. To respect families and communities, apart from English, instructions were available in other languages also in the services. further, festivals of different cultural background are celebrated

STEP 4

  1. Children are provided with puzzles and quizzes to solve
  2. Regularly providing children with new, fun filled and challenging tasks and activities
  3. Supporting those children by providing quiet spaces

STEP 5

  1. Children’s learning is continuously assessed by watching their work, listen to them, have conversations with them and attend to their work and play. Educators also talk with children and their families about children’s interests, challenges they face and what they know, can do and understand.
  2. By communicating with children, families and educators, feedback is being gathered. Educators communicate with parents while they come to drop or receive children, through formal meetings, by casually talking on calls and through informal meetings. Educators may also refer to documentation by other educators to gather feedback.
  3. Each curriculum that is being designed for children is designed in accordance with EYLF learning outcome. Then the children’s interests and activities are being observed and assessed to understand their learning process and to ensure that it is in accordance with EYLF learning outcomes.
  4. The service’s philosophy is to ensure every staff member has a shared understanding of their commitment and work respectfully to develop children’s abilities to become successful, competent and capable learners. Thus, the curriculum is designed as per children’s individual needs and staff assists in effective learning and Organisation Development of every child.

STEP 6

  1. When a child is found interested in some material or equipment used by other child and which is not in his curriculum, he is immediately provided with that and the child is encouraged and supported to further explore and experiment with materials provided.
  2. I believed that every child is fond of music and dance and thus, included dance sessions for every child in the centre. But I realized that few of the children are not interested in dancing and did not enjoy the sessions. Thus, I must be cautious of not affect my beliefs to design curriculum rather focus on every child’s individual interest.
  3. On reviewing my first program plan, I found that my program, although was designed to cater individual needs and requirement of every child, but still it was being generalized at few places. For instance, music and dance session was included in each child’s plan without taking into account his interest. Thu, I must improve on this point.
  4. In future, I would strictly take each child’s interest and requirements into consideration without generalizing even on a single area. Further, I would ensure that materials and equipments are enough for all children as any child may get interested in any equipment seeing other children playing with it. Thus, this point would also be considered in future.

Part B

Education and care plan

Child’s views and preferences: Maria loves her toy cat and takes her everywhere. She keeps the toy with her in all activities and does not like to be separated from her. She is inclined towards quite play and imaginative play activities.

A number of activities are being organized like indoor playing, outdoor activities, water play, etc along with art and craft session and dance sessions.  Maria is observed and assessed to check whether her learning experience is It is ensured that the child is continuously being monitored and in case she needs assistance or support, she is being provided with that. Educator is in continuous communication with the family. Her progress and activities are being discussed regularly and her leaning program is being modified as per her changing interest areas.

Step 2: assessing children’s learning and development

Child 1 child’s progress, relationships, interests and experience both in and outside the service. 

The child shows a good progress and is better at making relationships now and maintaining them. She is involved in hobbies and interests and further enhancing them.

Child 1 further actions required or additional activities and needs

She needs remove her fears which still exist and thus she needs to undergo activities which remove her fear of crowded places and strange people. She needs to be familiar to animals so that her fear of dogs gets eradicated.

Child 2 child’s progress, relationships, interests and experience both in and outside the service

This child has improved but on a very small level as she is not getting proper support from the family. She still feels isolated and lonely and fearful to dark places and staying alone.

Child 2 further actions required or additional activities and needs

The child needs more support from the family and the counsellors and more friendly sessions so that she gets social and removes her fears.

Child 3 child’s progress, relationships, interests and experience both in and outside the service

The child has immensely improved and his aggression has been reduced very much. He has also become socially interactive with his father and getting involved in group activities in his school.

Child 3 further actions required or additional activities and needs

The sessions need to be continued with this child as he will have a perfect control over his anger and will maintain healthy relationships with his step-father and other members in his school and community.

  1. Children are allowed to spend a lot of time to have dramatic and imaginative play by themselves or with their peers. They are provided with toys and props like cars, dolls, figures, etc to support this kind of play.
  2. Age appropriate experiences and activities are being arranged and implemented for children where a range of creative experiences are provided to children using several natural and recycled materials.
  3. Either two children or Group of children are provided with new puzzles to be solved together. The educators provide little support but let the children assists each other in solving the puzzle.
  4. The children are provided an outdoor environment for child led play where the large open spaces and natural resources help them is using their imagination and develop their play.
  5. A lot of free and open space is provided to children along with lots of materials like recycled materials, clay, wires, paper mache, etc in indoor areas while bricks, timber etc in outdoor areas so that they may play and modify their environment as per their choice. There is a large notice board at children’s level where they can display their work themselves.
  6. Open ended items are being provided to children and the areas is well defined into separate sections like art and craft, construction area, music and movement area, sensory play, etc.
  7. To promote learning dispositions like curiosity, imagination and creativity, children are allowed to play with clays and crayons in indoor environment where they can freely choose what to do with these materials.
  8. Children are provided with variety of leaves of different color, shades, shapes, textures, etc. they are given barks, twigs, shells of different size and shape and also fruits and vegetables.
  9. Closely observe the children when they play and experience different material and communicate with them regarding their likes and dislikes.
  10. Children get bored with same things and therefore, regularly, they are provided with new materials to have different experience. Further, the environment is regularly reviewed in every 15 days to check whether the materials and activities are in accordance with children’s learning needs or not an whether children are finding the activities interesting.
  11. A variety of types of cooking and eating utensils for dramatic play are provided to children: chopsticks, forks, spoons, spatulas, rice bowls, wooden bowls, plates, woks, tortilla presses, etc to reflect diverse group of people. Further, images of diverse family styles are being placed in the services.
  12. Taking children out into natural business environment like beach or the bush with the support of educators and caregivers
  13. Children who face difficulty in socializing are provided with quiet spaces and who demonstrate challenging behavior are engaged in quiet play to have time for reflection